Erik Johnson

Deputy ALD for Programs


Erik Johnson was named Deputy Associate Laboratory Director for Programs in the Photon Sciences Directorate in 2010. Before the Light Sources Directorate reorganization as the Photon Sciences Directorate, in October 2010, Johnson served as Interim Chair of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Prior to that, he was Deputy Director of the NSLS-II Accelerator Systems Division and, earlier, the Interface Manager for that division within the NSLS-II Project, responsible for the identification and coordination of technical interfaces between the accelerator and other project elements.

Johnson has enjoyed a varied career at NSLS, starting with a ‘temporary’ postdoctoral position in 1985 focusing on surface chemistry and working through a series of scientific staff appointments in the beamline group. During that time, he developed a wide range of instruments to address specific experimental issues that ultimately impacted a broader field. This work included contributions in soft x-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy, magnetic reflectivity, hard x-ray microfabrication, and photon beam monitoring instruments. Much of the work was at the interface between beamlines and accelerators, leading to his role as the project manager for the construction of the Laboratory's Deep Ultra Violet Free Electron Laser.

He served as head of the Experimental Systems Group from 1998 to 2001, when he became NSLS Associate Chair for Operations and Engineering, holding that position until 2007. That year, he joined the NSLS-II Project as Interface Manager for the Accelerator Systems Division.

Johnson holds a Bachelor of Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University. Awarded tenure at Brookhaven Lab in 1993, he has an L-Access Authorization and is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP).

Professional Activities

Phone: 344-4603
Fax: 631-344-3395
Email: johnson@bnl.gov


Education

  • Ph.D. 1985: Chemical Engineering, Cornell University
  • B.S. 1980: Chemical Engineering, University Minnesota